PLATF9RM culture: Why Are We Called PLATF9RM?

PLATF9RM Culture is a new series that’ll investigate the secrets and quirks of our burgeoning business community.

“So, why are you called PLATF9RM?”


We get asked this question. A lot. (Almost as much as we get asked,"What’s the Wifi password?” But that’s another conversation altogether.)

We’re pleased that people are curious about the etymology of our name. It means they’re curious about us, which is way better than the alternative.

So we thought the time’s right to explain the genesis of the PLATF9RM moniker. Here’s the truth:


In 2012 Seb Royle, founder of PLATF9RM , moved from London to Brighton with his family. Whilst here, he continued to commute to the capital.

During those mornings on the 0706 to Waterloo, Seb would lament the time lost. Seb – and his partner Jo – had been originally attracted to Brighton for its openness, its opportunities and its sense of adventure. Commuting each day surely meant Seb risked missing all these?

But that’s not really the story…

All Brighton’s positive traits stem from its inhabitants. It’s a city with a deep creative heritage: from Prince Regent to the Mods, to Lord Olivier and David Shrigley. It’s always been populated by freakishly talented people drawn here by the universities, the music, the history, the art, the Green Party and the fact you can thrive being the person you want to be.

But over the years it had become beset by some negative connotations: that old ‘graveyard of ambition’ accusation never came unstuck. You could move to Brighton but – if you were really determined to succeed – you’d probably have to commute to London.


Seb knew it didn’t have to be like this. Why couldn’t Brighton – in the 21st-century; the age of the digital nomad and remote working – become a new home for creativity and business in its own right?

The city needed a culture change. It needed places, hubs, where super-talented people could meet and collaborate. Where ideas could spark and catch fire in the space of an unplanned coffee. It needed another way.


Brighton’s train station had eight platforms. Eight ways out of the city. It needed a ninth way to keep these people here. PLATF9RM was born.